\With an estimated 244 million individuals who now live outside their country of origin, there has been a widespread of actions throughout the United States to change the laws for migrating to America. However, those changes have created obstacles for migrants.

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) acts on the behalf of individuals who believe their rights have been violated under the U.S. Constitution.

Founded in 1920, the non-profit organization began its advocacy for protecting individual rights with its first case during a time when there was rampant anti-war protests and became involved in the protection of rights under the First Amendment.

The ACLU now takes on cases involving numerous other causes, with immigration rights being one of them.

The Lacey and Larkin Foundation, located in Arizona, has supported the ACLU through its challenges with immigration policies. In 2013, Michael Lacey and Jim Larkin founded the local foundation as a way to work with advocacy groups to pass on information to immigration communities and advocate on their behalf. Read more: Jim Larkin | Crunchbase and Jim Larkin | LinkedIn

The Lacey and Larkin Foundation has expanded to reach as many of the Arizona residents as possible through outreach efforts and attending events and rallies that are led by the Latino and Hispanic community. Supplying them with invaluable information and resources, Michael and Jim have been leaders within the public showing a responsibility that has connected extremely-well throughout Arizona.

When Arizona SB 1070 was passed, it took on an infamous name known as the “Papers Please” bill. The bill originated as the Support Our Law Enforcement and Safe Neighborhood Act. The law required individuals who migrated to the country to register within 30 days and to maintain proper identification at all times. Learn more about Jim Larkin and Michael Lacey: http://www.laceyandlarkinfronterafund.org/about-lacey-larkin-frontera-fund/michael-lacey/

However, the law took a turn for the worse, when state law enforcement officers began to apply it citizens within Arizona. Officers began stopping individuals for no other reason other than to search those who appeared to identify from another country.

After countless complaints received, the ACLU took action against the state of Arizona and Governor Jan Brewer, arguing the law was unconstitutional, and the actions taken by law enforcement were acts of “racial profiling”.

After a long fought battle which ended in a U.S. Supreme Court ruling, the ACLU claimed victory with the Lacey and Larkin Foundation by its side in support for the Arizonian community. The case resulted in the dismantlement of several parts of the law, which were deemed unconstitutional.